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Sep 14 10

Youth Friendly Communities

by Marion

Here is a resource, an article and an application about Youth Friendly Communities.

Download the 2010 Good Practices resource from Youth Friendly Communities,  Learn more about the communities who received recognition at the Youth Friendly Community Ceremony held in October 2009 at Queen’s Park in Toronto. The 2010 Youth Friendly Community Application is now online, and helpful hints regarding your community’s application.

Sep 14 10

Champions of Change

by Marion

Research has shown youth are attracted to programs which meet their unique and diverse needs. Arts programs go a long way to do this (creativity, self-expression, meaningful engagement, positive relationships with peers and adults, etc.).

Here is a resource which provides great statistical and general information on why and how arts programs are good for youth. If you are interested in starting or expanding an arts program, this information will lend credibility to your grant application or discussion with a decision-maker. It is 114 pages long. Take a look at the shorter Executive Summary at the beginning to see what you might want to print/save.

Champions of Change

Sep 14 10

Why Teens are not Involved in Out-of-School Time Programs: The Youth Perspective

by Marion

Whether you are new to programming with youth or have been doing it for years, here is a great easy-to-read resource that speaks to why teens are not involved in programs – from the youth perspective.  You can take this information and, if designing a new program, use these suggestions to help develop your program model. Or, you can take this information and, if you already have a program in place, cross reference what you are doing to determine if there are areas for potential improvement.

WHY TEENS ARE NOT INVOLVED IN OUT-OF-SCHOOL TIME PROGRAMS: THE YOUTH PERSPECTIVE

Sep 14 10

YAC Link – Tips and Tricks for Starting a Youth Advisory Council

by Marion

A joint report from the McCreary Centre, Powell River and Tia’Amin Youth Advisory Councils.

This information is great for starting a youth council and for assessing how your council is functioning!

The four sections:

  1. Why a YAC;
  2. Getting it Started;
  3. Keeping it Going; and
  4. Adult Support

are all simply written, with easy-to-understand graphics and helpful notes (e.g. adults should be a ‘guide on the side not a sage on the stage’…. you have to love it!).

YAC Link – Tips and Tricks for Starting a Youth Advisory Council

Sep 14 10

Strategies for Improving Out-of-School Programs in Rural Communities

by Marion

Here’s a nice short article on how to better program with and for rural youth. It’s out of the States so its references on models, etc. are from there, but some of the ideas are easy and transferable to a Canadian context.

Strategies for Improving Out-of-School Programs in Rural Communities

Sep 14 10

Safe Spaces Training Module

by Marion

The National Youth Advocacy Coalition has a training module around creating safe spaces for LGBTQ youth. You can access this training via iTunes video, YouTube or with slides (no narration) and handouts. The materials include pre and post tests. It’s easy to read and understand material suitable for staff and volunteer training as well as a participant orientation session.

Safe Spaces Training Module

Sep 13 10

Audience Insights – Communicating to Teens (Aged 12–17)

by Marion

Here’s an interesting newsletter about how youth use media and how to communicate with youth. While the newsletter is informative about how to get health topic communications to youth, the approaches adaptable to other topics such as recreation, education, or employment opportunities.

Audience Insights – Communicating to Teens (Aged 12–17)

Sep 13 10

Youth Volunteers at Your Library – Engaging Youth in Your Library

by Marion

Here’s a neat resource put out by the HeartWood Centre for Community Youth Development titled: Youth Volunteers at Your Library. While you may not have a library, two things are of interest in this document. The first is that, to help with positive youth development in your community, you can pass it on to your local library so that they can begin (if they haven’t already started) to meaningfully engage youth in their programs and services. The second thing is that much about youth engagement in this document relates to working with youth in other and general contexts, so it’s likely also applicable to your setting! Check out the appendices to find some nice and short helpful hints on ways to engage and work with youth. It’s easy to read, only around 30 pages long.

Youth Volunteers at Your Library – Engaging Youth in Your Library

Sep 13 10

Anti-Gang Strategies and Interventions

by Marion

This is an article out of Australia about youth gangs. Some interesting reading here, some of which includes characteristics for joining and leaving gangs (page 13/14). In looking at these, it is easy to make the case as to how youth development programs – if they are frequent, available and no/low cost – can be great diversions to youth entering the gang culture. Page 38 – 42 also specifically references the need for youth facilities whether it is stand alone or with designated youth space which is part of a community centre (this is one of the Youth Friendly Community Recognition Program criteria too).

Anti-Gang Strategies and Interventions

Sep 13 10

Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth

by Marion

Active Healthy Kids Canada has released its fifth Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth.  This year, the focus of the report is on the important role physical activity plays in facilitating learning and academic performance.   Children and youth who are more physically active showed improved memory, concentration and attention span – leading to better results in school.  The report card also highlights inequities in physical activity – especially for low-income children and youth and those with disabilities. Some findings to note are:

* 13% of Grade 10 girls and 27% of Grade 10 boys reported that they were "physically active" for 60 minutes every day (2005-2006 HBSC)

* There has been a decline in sports participation in youth aged 15 to18 years between 1992 and 2005, from 77% to 59% (General Social Survey, Statistics Canada).

*Canada ranks 23rd out of 40 developed countries in the proportion of youth accumulating more than 2 hours or more per day of screen time – that is, Canada is among the upper half of countries with the highest proportion of youth accumulating excessive screen time (2005-2006 HBSC).

This information is useful if you are looking to increase local investment in youth physical activity, sport and recreation programs and/or arts and culture programs (which offer creative alternatives to 'screen time'). Active Healthy Kids Canada has produced both the full report card and a "short form" which provides useful statistics and information.  To download the report card, please visit the Active Healthy Kids Canada.

Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth

Sep 13 10

Feedback Report for Anyplace Secondary & Elementary Schools

by Marion

Here’s an interesting read out of the University of Waterloo’s research department. While it is a review of school environments, it has a lot of good information that:

  1. can be used by any group that operates out of a facility
  2. can be used by any group that has physical activity and/or healthy eating programs
  3. can be used by any group that is looking for cited information (referenced in a bibliography) to use in program development or expansion or funding to strengthen the case why and how physical activity and healthy eating benefit youth

While it’s not too long a report (35 pages), your best bets to get the info you are looking for are on pages 6, 7 and 15 on…. This one is for secondary schools.

Secondary School

(you can forward this one on elementary schools to your colleagues who work with children….

Elementary Schools

Sep 13 10

Youth-Adult Partnerships in Public Action: Principles, Organizational Culture & Outcomes

by Marion

Here is a 48-page case study on the benefits of Youth and Adult Partnerships. It’s an interesting read with the salient points being summarized on pages 18 and 22 in a great check list format that you can use to either develop or assess your adult/youth partnership models. Enjoy!

Youth-Adult Partnerships in Public Action: Principles, Organizational Culture & Outcomes

Sep 13 10

Living and Learning with New Media: Summary of Findings from the Digital Youth Project

by Marion

This document looks at all forms of ‘new’ media and how youth use it to learn and socialize. It’s over 50 pages long so scan through the Executive Summary at the beginning and the Implications nearing the end on page 39.

Of interest are some of the adult assumptions that are challenged here about youth’s use of electronic devices. This information can be used to help defend the use of programs, such as FaceBook, or in looking to develop a case to fund a computer lab in a youth centre.

Living and Learning with New Media: Summary of Findings from the Digital Youth Project

Sep 13 10

Creating a Youth Master Plan

by Marion

The National League of Cities has developed a resource on Creating a Master Youth Plan. It's not a long read, but it does have salient points for your community to consider when developing one. You could actually take the headings and create a check list which would act as a series of operation principals for developing the master plan.
And, to make life even easier, if you want to see some examples of Youth Master Plans that have been created (all references are American), just go to www.nlc.org/IYEF/youthdevelopment/ymp/examples.aspx and follow the links.  There are examples of communities with populations ranging from 10,000 and up, who have developed youth master plans.

Creating a Youth Master Plan

Sep 13 10

Physical Education and Active Play Help Teens Maintain Normal Weight as Adults

by Marion

We are all looking for new and innovative ways to fight obesity and yet, as this article states, there are some easy ways right under our noses….

Let kids skateboard, rollerblade and/or bike more than four times a week and those activities will be the most likely ones that will not lead that young person into being obese as an adult. So, for those communities who are having a challenge getting local decision-makers to support skateparks, bike lanes and/or BMX tracks, feel free to strengthen your case by quoting from the attached article.

Physical Education and Active Play Help Teens Maintain Normal Weight as Adults

Sep 13 10

Canadian Social Trends – Kids’ Sports

by Marion

This research, from Statistics Canada, speaks to the change in sport participation between 1992 and 2005 for those ages 5 – 14, and also to the role that the family plays in sport involvement. While this is a ‘younger than usual’ Sprynt age, the research does break out 11 – 14 year olds, and it does speak to male and female differentials. There is also a very interesting piece that references adolescents (whose parents are involved in sport) as the group with the highest involvement in organized sports (ages 15 – 19 years).

A nice and easy read, and a great bunch of research to build the case for looking for ways to create sport opportunities that meet the needs of adolescents relative to children and/or to market sports to adults as a means to encouraging the involvment of their children in sport.

Canadian Social Trends – Kids’ Sports

Sep 13 10

More Time for Teens: Understanding Teen Participation – Frequency, Intensity, Duration – in Boys and Girls Clubs

by Marion

Here is a research paper “More Time for Teens: Understanding Teen Participation – Frequency, Intensity, Duration – in Boys and Girls Clubs.” While this paper speaks to the Club experience, the learnings are representative of youth centres in general – places which are dedicated to youth and/or children and youth.

Of specific note are the Lessons Learned in the Executive Summary and the chapter on the Factors That Contribute to Teen Participation. The youth at these clubs represent diverse cultures and are generally from the lower economic strata however the information is quite transferrable to main stream youth. Good information for program development and recommendations for program expansion (reference the information on frequency and duration). An easy read if you skip through the theoretical and research information.

More Time for Teens: Understanding Teen Participation – Frequency, Intensity, Duration – in Boys and Girls Clubs

Sep 13 10

Putting Positive Youth Development Into Practice – A Resource Guide

by Marion

Here is a resource out of the States on Positive Youth Development (PYD). Some of it speaks just to iniatives that are happening south of the border, however there are a number of pages you might want to check out, including (and these are the page numbers as referenced in the document)

9 – check list for PYD
16 – how to work with the media to get your PYD message out

19 on – check list of if you have PYD strategies in your progmam

24 – strategies for working effectively with youth

27 – listing of groups to collaborate with

33 on – how to team up with business, schools, service providers, media and government (really good and easy check list of what you might want to do to develop your relationships with these groups)

And, there are some really nice appendices you might just want to take a look at too.

Great resource for understanding PYD, sharing that message with those who may not yet understand it (decision-makers, politicians, business), creating new approaches, assessing existing services, and/or engaging others in your community with the enhancement services.

Putting Positive Youth Development Into Practice – A Resource Guide

Sep 13 10

Report on the Health of Canada’s Children and Youth

by Marion

Reaching for the Top Hits the Mark for Healthy Children and Youth
Last week, Dr. Kellie Leitch released her report on the health of Canada’s Children and Youth. She calls on all orders of government to work with community recreation providers to implement those recommendations. To view a summary of Dr. Leitch’s report, please visit the Health Canada Website.

Report on the Health of Canada’s Children and Youth

Sep 13 10

Inside the Teenage Brain

by Marion

Research has been undertaken over the past 25 years on the brain development of adolescents. It’s now understand that it is during adolescence that the brain undergoes the second most rapid and complex change after the first few years of childhood development. You can use this information to help inform those with whom you work as to why diversity in programs is needed, why safe risks are needed, why youth need ongoing physical, intellectual, emotional, social and moral stimulation.

Here is a nicely done interview with a researcher, who had a show done on PBS. It gives a good and understandable explanation of the process of the development of the adolescent brain.

Inside the Teenage Brain

Sep 13 10

Mentoring.org

by Marion

Some of you may be involved with youth mentor programs, or may be considering starting them. Rather than starting from scratch, here is an excellent set of resources to help you on your way. In addition to the resources on this particular page, there are additional resources on this site that you might want to wander around to.

Mentoring.org

Sep 13 10

Orientation 2: Improve the Health and Well-being of Youth

by Marion

This nicely presented document was put out by Quebec as a consultation paper on its Youth Action Strategy 2005 – 2008. It was just released in April and lays out a series of points that include a brief description of each section, a short presentation of the strategic choices relative to that section, and questions related to the strategic choices that help the reader consider what might or could be done. It’s just a nicely framed and engaging style of report. The part in which you might be interested is Orientation 2: Improve the Health and Well-being of Youth.

Sep 13 10

Evaluation Exchange – Evaluating Out-of-School Time

by Marion

Here is the latest Evaluation Exchange reviews findings which speaks to outcomes for youth in ‘out of school time’ activities [anything from sports, community programs, arts, etc.] . This issue also includes articles on what is known from existing research and evaluation about the results that are possible from out-of-school time programming, expert commentary on what the future out-of-school time research and evaluation agenda should look like, and information about hands-on research and evaluation tools and resources.

Evaluation Exchange – Evaluating Out-of-School Time

Sep 13 10

VECTOR: Video Exploration of Careers, Opportunities and Realities

by Marion

VECTOR means Video Exploration of Careers, Opportunities and Realities. There are around 20 portals on the main page to other websites on mentoring, money, careers, support groups, etc. Use this as a reference to inform your work with youth or let youth know that this resource exists for them too.

VECTOR: Video Exploration of Careers, Opportunities and Realities

Sep 13 10

Social Inclusion

by Marion

he Laidlaw Foundation has just released 3 new working papers on social inclusion. One may be of particular interest to you and it is “The Role of Recreation in Promoting Social Inclusion” by Peter Donnelly. A synopsis of all 3 papers can be found at Laidlaw Foundation (go to the Working Papers Series on Social Inclusion under Laidlaw Publications in the Library tab) and this synopsis is 30 pages long. Peter’s report is around 38 pages in length and can be also be found in full on that page.

Working Papers Series on Social Inclusion

Sep 13 10

A Toolkit for Youth & Adults in Charting Assets Creating Change

by Marion

In 1996, the Innovation Center in partnership with National 4-H Council began a journey with partners in diverse communities across the United States to find, test, adapt, and document tools and approaches for creating positive community change and building partnerships between young people and adults. This experience is shared in the form of the Building Community Tool Kit. For free sample excerpts of this resource, or for other great resources from the Innovation Centre.

A TOOLKIT FOR YOUTH & ADULTS IN CHARTING ASSETS AND CREATING CHANGE

Sep 13 10

Interested in what girls and young women are thinking about?

by Marion

Interested in what girls and young women are thinking about? Here are some sites which can provide some inside into this generation. In some cases, the site is designed specifically for use by girls/young women (good in that it can give you some ideas about what’s hot and what’s not). In others, it’s also designed as a resource for adults with research and other information you may find helpful. The first site is Canadian, the others American but, as you will find when reviewing them, a border doesn’t make all that much difference!

www.caaws.ca

www.urstrong.com (girlpower)

www.girlsinc.org

Sep 13 10

Canadian Council on Social Development (CCSD)

by Marion

You’ve probably all heard the news about Canada’s scorecard on children and youth in poverty over the past ten years. Of note is the increasing concern that children and youth from lower income backgrounds have less access to affordable and accessible recreation opportunities.

Canadian Council on Social Development (CCSD)

Sep 13 10

The World Programme of Action for Youth to the Year 2000 and Beyond

by Marion

A 32 page document that outlines a Resolution adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations on March 13, 1996. If you are looking for some nice information to strengthen a presentation or proposal you are preparing, consider the following…. – The United Nations considers youth to be ages 15 to 24 – 10 priority areas were identified in 1996, with Leisure-time activities being one of those ten – Members of the United Nations are working to see ‘young people…. aspire to full participation in the life of society…. including participation in decision-making process; …. places and facilities for cultural, recreation and sports activities to improve the living standards of young people in both rural and urban areas – Under the educational priority, one of the proposals for action is an infrastructure for training youth workers and youth leaders – Under the employment area, one of the proposals is to provide voluntary community services involving youth and, where none exist, to have youth organizations involved in the designing, planning, implementing and evaluating of the programs – Under the hunger and poverty area, one of the proposals is to make farming more rewarding and life in agricultural areas more attractive – Under the drug abuse area, one of the proposals for action is to give priority to preventative measures….rural areas should be provided with adequate social-economic opportunities and administrative services which could discourage young people from migrating to urban areas….youth from poor urban settings should have access to specific education, employment and leisure programs, particularly during long school holidays – Under Leisure-time activities, there are four separate proposals for action. These are located on pages 23 and 24 of the document.

The World Programme of Action for Youth to the Year 2000 and Beyond

Sep 13 10

A municipal perspective on opportunities for physical activity: Trends from 2000 – 2004

by Marion

The Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute released a document in 2005 titled ‘A municipal perspective on opportunities for physical activity: Trends from 2000 – 2004.’ It may sound like a heady title, and it’s not a light scan at 103 pages, however it does contain some interesting information that can help inform our work with youth and physical activity, and can give us an idea of what challenges may life ahead. For example, those in municipalities of greater than 100,000 are finding it harder in 2004 to find information on physical activity opportunities than they did in 2000, yet those in communities smaller than that size are finding it easier (page 5). Hmmm. The perceived usefulness of the information in the larger centres has also decreased during that four year period, while it has increased in the smaller settings (page 7). Since 2000, more municipalities have been working with more schools, the workplace, health settings and not for profit groups to increase reach to and deliver physical activity programs (page 15). So, if your municipality is not, you will soon be in the minority. And, what might this information tell you… programs that support children to be active have decreased, subsidies for children’s programming has decreased, and programs for children and youth at-risk have increased (page 16. Another hmmmm. And, while there has been good work done in order to increase access to community use of schools, municipalities in Ontario as less likely that the average Canadian municipalities to indicate they have an agreement regarding shared use of facilities with schools (page 30).Overall, lots of interesting information.

A municipal perspective on opportunities for physical activity in small communities4

Sep 13 10

Capturing Promising Practices in Recruitment and Retention of Frontline Youth Workers

by Marion

Here is a document that helps those in the business of hiring and supervising youth development staff be better informed and prepared when doing. Put out by the National Youth Development Learning Network, it provides a nice breakdown of how to recruit and how to retain staff. The full report is broken into easy-to-download individual files.

Capturing Promising Practices in Recruitment and Retention of Frontline Youth Workers

Sep 13 10

Moving Beyond the Barriers: Attracting and Sustaining Youth Participation in Out-of-School Time Programs

by Marion

Here is some great research from the Harvard Family Research Project on the benefits of out of school programming for youth. The content of the research is listed in the body of the article, with hot linked footnotes to the research from whence it came. A great way to build up any presentation to council or funding proposal in support of youth work.

Moving Beyond the Barriers: Attracting and Sustaining Youth Participation in Out-of-School Time Programs

Sep 13 10

Youth Peer Education Toolkit

by Marion

Here are some excellent resources on peer education models. They include a Training of Trainers Manual (200 pages), Standards for Peer Education Programmers (80 pages), and Theatre-Based Techniques for Peer Education (100 page training manual). These are through the Family Health International group out of the States. While the information is based on youth working on peer education around HIV AIDS topics, the materials and resources are excellent and highly transferable to other topics.

Youth Peer Education Toolkit

Sep 13 10

The Progress of Canada’s Children & Youth

by Marion

The Canadian Council on Social Development (CCSD) has been producing Progress since 1996. This magazine-style publication provides a wealth of information on different factors that influence the health and well-being of Canadian children and youth. This 7th edition reports on many indicators, including family life, economic security, physical safety, learning, and more. Because the report tracks this information over time, it helps identify trends, successes, and challenges. Specifically, you might want to check out the chapters on Community Resources (includes recreation), social inclusion, and tools (which include some fact sheets). You can find the full report, in downloadable chapters.

The Progress of Canada’s Children & Youth

Sep 13 10

Preventing Adolescent Gang Involvement

by Marion

Here is a 12 page article in the Juvenile Justice Bulletin (US Department of Justice) about factors and prevention strategies related to youth gang involvement. Examples of prevention programs are provided, with a brief overview of each program’s components. It’s an easy read and has some good basic information that can be used in reports, presentations and proposals.

Preventing Adolescent Gang Involvement

Sep 13 10

Donors to Arts and Culture Organizations in Canada

by Marion

Here is updated research about donors to arts and culture in Canada. Many organizations have arts and culture as part of their big R recreation mix, and it is good to see who is supporting those activities and there may well be cross over to the other pieces of the big R recreation. This report is based mainly on the 1997 and 200 National Surveys on Giving Volunteering and Participation (NSGVP).

Donors to Arts and Culture Organizations in Canada

Sep 13 10

Canadian Population Health Initiative (CPHI)

by Marion

This resource is put out by the Canadian Institute for Health Information. It explains how teens’ (12 – 19) experiences can influence their health later in life. The information is useful when building the case for funders to support youth development programs. Scroll down to the Report piece. Click on that and then on the next page click on the Full Report. If you don’t want to print out the whole thing, interesting parts include three or four bullet points about youth relative to: their income and socioeconomic status, education, social networks and support environment, employment and working conditions, early child development, physical environment, personal health practices and coping skills, biological and genetic factors, health services, gender, culture, and mass media and technology. There is some good discussion that links asset development with positive youth development. All in all a good resource.

Canadian Population Health Initiative (CPHI)

Canadian Population Health Initiative (CPHI) Action Plan 2007-2010

Sep 13 10

What Makes For A Successful Youth Centre?

by Marion

Here is a short 11 page read about the factors that contribute to Successful Youth Centres. This document was created by the Heartwood Centre for community Youth Development in Nova Scotia.

What Makes For A Successful Youth Centre?

Sep 13 10

Canadian Community Health Survey: Obesity among children and adults

by Marion

Here is the latest release of statistical information about adolescent obesity. In the past 25 years, obesity for youth ages 12 to 17 years has tripled, moving from 3% to 9% of that age population. This is the shorter version of the press release around general obesity in Canada (2004).

Canadian Community Health Survey: Obesity among children and adults

Sep 13 10

Usability of Websites for Teenagers

by Marion

In the age of technology, we can better use this resource by first understanding who and what our clients relate to. This link is a quick overview of findings from research into what youth think and like about various different websites – what turns them on, what drives them away, and what keeps them there. If you are really interested in this topic, you could buy the 128 page report or, if you just want to get a bit more acquainted with the topic of youth and websites, read the overview in the link and test your website against what it is saying that youth want.

Usability of Websites for Teenagers

Sep 13 10

Index to Group Activities, Games, Exercises & Initiatives

by Marion

Check out this website from down under where they have loads of fun with icebreakers and games. Here is a great quote that is on this home page “Once the game is over, the King and the pawn go back in the same box” – Italian proverb.

Index to Group Activities, Games, Exercises & Initiatives

Sep 13 10

New Strategies in Foundation Grantmaking for Children and Youth

by Marion

This is an interesting read out of the States that speaks to how Foundations are viewing their funding programs for children and youth activities. You can use this information to a) better understand what potential funders may be thinking as they review your applications, and b) see where our funding bodies might be headed in the future. We certainly hope this latter piece has some truth to it as there is great interest in funding youth development south of the border! It may seem like a long read, but it’s really not, there is just lots of big print!

New Strategies in Foundation Grantmaking for Children and Youth

Sep 13 10

As a Youth Friendly Community Small and Rural Communities – Lessons from the Field

by Marion

This program is for Ontario communities only, however the information included would be useful in any community. The Play Works Partnership (www.playworkspartnership.ca) is encouraging communities to apply to be recognized as ‘youth friendly.’ Agencies, municipalities, and/or youth groups can submit the application for their community. Whether your community chooses to apply or not, the youth friendly criteria is great information to start incorporating into youth development strategies in your neighbourhood.

As a Youth Friendly Community Small and Rural Communities – Lessons from the Field

Sep 13 10

How to Create Successful Partnerships for Community Action

by Marion

The Heartwood Institute in Nova Scotia supports youth development. Here is a paper with commentary from youth action teams as to how the Institute successfully incorporates youth in the picture, and the driver's seat, in a meaningful way. It's a good self-check list against your agency's or department's offerings.

How to create successful partnerships for community action

How to create successful partnerships for community action PowerPoint presentation

Sep 13 10

Young people in Canada: their health and well-being: Executive Summary

by Marion

Here is a link to an executive summary (8 page) and a full document (many pages!) on the health and wellbeing of Canada’s youth (a representative sample of 11, 13 and 15 year olds). This summary is a great sensitizer on youth in general, with the full document probing deeper into socio-economic inequalities, the home, the peer group, the school experience, health risk behaviours, healthy living, bullying and fighting, injuries and emotional health.

Young people in Canada: their health and well-being: Executive Summary

Sep 13 10

Starting and Staying on Track: Youth Motivations in Participating in Recreation

by Marion

The Ontario Association of Youth Employment Centres researched what kept youth participating in recreational opportunities. First Work, formerly known as OAYEC, found that youth say that their top reasons for joining recreation programs is to have fun and learn new things. They also tell us that employability skills learning and the prospect of getting a job through recreation is part of their decision. Read this report and learn some things that you might want to build into your youth recreation program to attract them and keep them involved.

Starting and Staying on Track: Youth Motivations in Participating in Recreation

Sep 13 10

Urban Parks as Partners in Youth Development

by Marion

Here is an interesting article on how urban parks help promote asset development in youth. Of particular interest is youth leadership development through parks and some information on experiential learning through parks. It’s an easy read at 8 pages and helps build the case to help get youth into green settings.

Urban Parks as Partners in Youth Development

Sep 13 10

Participation in School Athletics – School Music or Other Performing Arts

by Marion

Here are two reports by the Child Trends Databank. While this information comes from the States, it provides some interesting commentary on youth participation (past grade 8) in school athletics  and youth participation in school music or other performing arts programs. Both speak to participation trends and comment on aspects of participation that are influenced by gender, parental involvement and post secondary aspirations. These are not long reports, and provide summary graphics of participation.

Participation in School Music or Other Performing Arts

Participation in School Athletics

Sep 13 10

Proposed Competencies & Recruitment and Selection for a Youth Development Worker

by Marion

The following summary of the proposed competencies for a Youth Development Worker and a summary of a proposed recruitment and selection process might be of interest to you and to those who will be hiring for these positions. For a more extended list of competencies, please contact Norma McDonald-Ewing at Conestoga College.

Competencies

Recruitment and Selection of YDW

Sep 13 10

Community Counts: How Youth Organizations Matter for Youth Development

by Marion

This 36 page document is a really good read about the role of youth serving programs and organizations, how youth benefit from those organizations that are youth and learning focused, and the role the community should and could take in supporting youth development. It also includes a series of recommendations for Community, Youth Organizations, Schools, Funders and Policy Makers. It was created for the Public Education Network out of Washington, DC.

Community Counts: How Youth Organizations Matter for Youth Development